Reasons LGBT cafes should exist

carrot-gallery:

  • Non-sexualized spaces
  • Inclusive so u don’t have to out urself
  • No alcohol so younger ppl have full access
  • I fukkin love chai lattes
  • No pressure to find hook-ups, lookin at you my aro/ace pals
  • No need to socialize u can literally sit at a table and be gay all by ur self

Please make these a thing

djurito:

i’m so here for bi and pan kids who use “gay” as a casual descriptor for themselves, especially when expressing their same-gender attraction. i’m here for you if you’re afraid to or uncomfortable with using “queer,” i’m here if you don’t have the energy to explain your sexuality every time you mention it, i’m here if you just like the sound and the way it rolls off the tongue. you’re great; keep doing what you’re doing.

lgbt-history-archive:

Gilbert Baker’s original rainbow flag, June 25, 1978. c/o @themuseumofmodernart. On June 25, 1978, thirty-eight years ago today, Gilbert Baker and friends raised a hand-sewn rainbow flag at San Francisco’s Civic Center during the city’s Gay Freedom Day, marking the first appearance of the now-ubiquitous symbol of Gay Pride. Baker first considered creating a flag for the gay liberation movement in 1976, during the United States’ bicentennial celebrations. “We are a people, a tribe if you will,” Baker explained. “And flags are about proclaiming power, so it’s very appropriate….We needed something beautiful, something from us. The rainbow is so perfect because it really fits our diversity in terms of race, gender, ages, all of those things.” Baker’s original flag had eight colors, each assigned its own meaning: hot pink-sexuality; red-life; orange-healing; yellow-sunlight; green-nature; turquoise-magic/art; blue-serenity/harmony; and violet-spirit. In 1979, when Baker approached the Paramount Flag Company about mass producing the flags, the hot pink fabric proved too expensive, so the color was dropped; soon after, organizers of the 1979 Gay Freedom Day Parade told Baker that they hoped to fly the flag in two halves, so Baker dropped indigo, leaving the six-striped flag that remains today. Because of his creation of the tribe’s flag, Baker, who is commonly seen in his drag queen persona, earned the drag name “Busty Ross.” #lgbthistory #lgbtherstory #lgbttheirstory #lgbtpride #queerhistorymatters #haveprideinhistory

shamelessfancies:

For Pride Month I made these flags in honor of those that are silenced, those who have had to hide their true selves for so long, and for those who have died because of who they are.

When people come out of the closet, when they finally show how they identify, they are asked many things and told many things about themselves. These are just some of the ways they are oppressed and marginalized. These are just a few representations of the community as well, there are so many others that face similar treatment.

Remember:

You are valid, you are loved, and you are not alone.

These will also be posted on Facebook. Feel free to repost them anywhere and on whatever you want.

For those that don’t recognize the flags, the descriptions are under the cut.

Keep reading