Meandering Around the Interweb

In my various hours of wandering through book blogs far and wide, I’ve come across some pretty fantastic posts lately, so I thought I would spotlight my favorites. Hopefully I can make this a semi-regular feature, although my laziness will test the bounds of my determination to do so, so stay tuned for now.

  • Ever have difficulty picturing a character as you read? Well, next time you’re puzzling over how to visualize the characters in a steampunk work, have no fear. Prada has done all the work for us, producing a gorgeous photo-shoot starring Gary Oldman, Garrett Hedlund, Willem Dafoe, and Jamie Bell wearing all manner of gorgeous steampunk duds.
  • Obviously I’m unforgivably late in realizing that J.K. Rowling wrote this brief Harry Potter prequel. I know I’m not the only one upset that she has stated her intentions not to write a Maurauders-era book, but this just compounds the disappointment.
  • In more Harry Potter-related news, it seems Daniel Radcliffe is the latest of the films’ stars to hop on the music video bandwagon. I tend to agree with the writer of this article in finding DanRad’s performance a benefit to his resume. What do you guys think of Radcliffe’s, Grint’s, and Watson’s performances? Should they stick to film?
  • And since there’s never too much of a good thing, this weekend I’m hoping to try out some of these Harry Potter-inspired cocktails. Thankfully, there are plenty to choose from, because I’m having a hard time choosing which to try first.
  • If you’re like me, you tend to collect unusual words. Well, this article on 25 Handy Words That Simply Don’t Exist in English will give you a few more for your collection. I’m particularly partial to Forelsket and Waldeinsamkeit.
  • I’ve been reading a lot lately about New Adult, how it differs from Adult and Young Adult fiction, and whether it should be classified as its own genre. For the Love of Contemporary, Chachic, Megan Burke, and Catie at The Readventurer have all had their say on the topic. I’m still undecided on my stance; I’d say around half of my favorite “young adult” books technically fit the description for New Adult, but I’m not sure segmenting out a new genre would be a benefit or a hindrance.

Created by droll to echo

  • Tor’s newsletter is always a goldmine of goodies, and this week was no exception. Check out the amazing Sherlock-inspired medieval tapestries at droll to echo’s blog.
  • Emily at Emily’s Reading Room recently wrote a lovely article on what it means to be a member of the book blogging community.
  • Kathy at A Glass of Wine wrote a great post about whether characters have to be likable or not in order for us to sympathize with them as readers. While my initial inclination was to say yes, I have to admit that I do love many of the decidedly unlikable characters she’s mentioned.
  • Courtney Summers recently wrote a great comparison of the book and movie versions of The Woman in Black for The Readventurer. I’ve only seen the movie, and I quite liked it, but after reading what she has to say, I’m on the lookout for a copy of Hill’s classic novel to compare for myself.
  • And finally, I come across a lot of bookshelves that I covet, but this one is in a league of its own.

I hope everyone has a lovely weekend!

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Meandering Around the Interweb

In my various hours of wandering through book blogs far and wide, I’ve come across some pretty fantastic posts lately, so I thought I would spotlight my favorites. Hopefully I can make this a semi-regular feature, although my laziness will test the bounds of my determination to do so, so stay tuned for now.

While I’m drowning in the tears that can only be brought on by The Reichenbach Fall, perhaps I’ll drink away my sorrows with some of these delightful Sherlock blend teas. I’m particularly curious to try Moriartea.

Heroes and Heartbreakers had some interesting television news this week. Apparently, come fall we will have a new Beauty and the Beast adaptation, this time with an update of the classic 80’s TV show. I can’t help but be rather disappointed with the trailer (and not only because I was an adamant Lana hater during the Smallville years). I’m sorry, but a little facial scar does not a beast make, especially when the monstrous attitude is replaced with a penchant for altruism. From the snippets we get here, it looks like he might become a tad more beastly when he’s in angry mode…but, no, wait- scratch that, he’s still handsome. Oh, well. At least we still have time to hope that the Anne of Green Gables modern update is better. But honestly, I’ll take Megan Follows and Jonathan Crombie any day.

The Piper’s Son happens to be my favorite Melina Marchetta, and Kat Kennedy over at the Cuddlebuggery Book Blog recently wrote a wonderful review that expresses all the reasons I love this book more eloquently than I could. In other Marchetta-related news, according to Goodreads, the fourth book in the Lumatere Chronicles has a name, and it’s…Ferragost. Thoughts? Do you think this the official title, as it doesn’t really fit in with the first three.

There’s some interesting discussion of late about just what dystopian actually means, and how it differs from post-apocalyptic fic.

I’m guaranteed to track down this Princess Bride-inspired wine pack for my next dinner party. And don’t worry, according to the website, the Inconceivable Cab holds no traces of iocane powder.

I can’t help but love reading Amber at Down the Rabbit Hole’s reactions to recently completing her first viewing of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. While I don’t agree with everything in her post about why Buffy and Spike are meant to be, she makes some good points nonetheless. I’m even more interested to hear what she has to say about her foray into the world of Season 8 comics, as I’ve abstained from them myself. Personally, I love how Whedon ended the show, and while I’m somewhat intrigued by what I’ve read of the comic continuation, I’m also too apprehensive to delve in myself.

The world lost a wonderful writer last week. As always, Neil Gaiman’s words regarding the love he held for Ray Bradbury’s work are beautifully poignant and a lovely tribute.

A Spell of Vengeance by D.B. Jackson

I’ve been salivating for D.B. Jackson’s Thieftaker since spotting the gorgeous Chris McGrath cover last year, and was so excited to receive an advance copy from NetGalley. The short story, “A Spell of Vengeance,” written for Tor.com makes me all the more excited to read it this weekend.

Once again, the scientific community has made a discovery that has gone shockingly unremarked-upon by the general populace. Bulgarian archaeologists have uncovered human remains from the Middle Ages with iron stakes protruding from their chests. These skeletons serve as evidence of actual vampire hunting back in the day. Beware, ye squeamish; the link leads to some relatively graphic images.

Jeaniene Frost and Ilona Andrews had a Twitter battle on behalf of their respective heroes, Bones and Curran. I think this speaks for itself.

Lynn Flewelling has written a short story in which Seregil from her Nightrunner series and Bast from Patrick Rothfuss’s Name of the Wind have a cage fight. I’ve never actually read Rothfuss (I know, I’m getting on it), but regardless, my money’s on Seregil every time.

And possibly one of the best things I’ve ever seen, Super Mercado has graced the world with Game of Thrones of Muppets. While they’re all super clever and fit in with the real cast surprisingly well, I think I stopped breathing when my eyes landed on Petyr Beakish and Dr. Varys Honeydew.

Meandering Around the Interweb

In my various hours of wandering through book blogs far and wide, I’ve come across some pretty fantastic posts lately, so I thought I would spotlight my favorites. Hopefully I can make this a semi-regular feature, although my laziness will test the bounds of my determination to do so, so stay tuned for now.

  • The trailer for Baz Luhrmann’s take on The Great Gatsby popped up last night. I’ve been drooling over set stills for months now (Leo…I mean, pretty clothes and sets, yes, that’s right…) but seeing the first glimpses of what the finished film will present is exciting. I’ll admit, Luhrmann’s films have always been somewhat hit-or-miss for me, but I’m oddly thrilled to see that this one appears to have a distinct Romeo and Juliet bent. Jack White’s shrill wails layered atop Nick Carraway’s dialogue gave me chills.
  • I recently read and raved about Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus. Her UK publishers have created a website that allows you to go on your own virtual tour of the delightful circus in question, and while I haven’t yet completed my journey, the sparse black and white depictions are quite lovely.
  • I live for the moment when you open up a newly-acquired old book and some creased, forgotten memento falls out from between the pages. Forgotten Bookmarks catalogues hundreds of such experiences in brilliantly simple photography, even typing out the contents of notes and inscriptions found within.
  • Ilona Andrews revisited an earlier blog post this week, recounting her school’s disastrous production of Romeo and Juliet. I couldn’t help but think back to my own equally calamitous experience as Romeo. You read that correctly, Romeo. Apparently, none of the guys were up to the task, and I said to myself, what the hell? Unfortunately, I rued the decision later as my female classmates scampered about in diaphanous gowns, while I was stuck in a tunic and tights, my hair scraped back like a drowned cat. Follow that with a sword fight in which Tybalt spontaneously decided that he would rather not die, leading to a comically ill-choreographed routine in which we chased each other about stage. And to top it all off, Juliet, unfortunately, simply couldn’t seem to reach the poison bottle in my hand, so I had to hand it to her, being a corpse notwithstanding. My theatrical career was short-lived.
  • Some spoilers for Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones follow, so you’ve been warned. For those who have seen the aforementioned literary film adaptations, you are probably aware that Sean Bean meets his grisly end in both. What some of you might not be aware of, though, is the fact that Sean Bean seems to die in every. single. movie.
  • I love books; it’s no secret. Yet I love them for more than the enjoyment that can be found within the pages. I adore them as an aesthetic accent. Those who have seen my home know that there is more shelf space than there is bare wall. The English Muse has an excellent post on ways to incorporate books into room design.
  • The long-awaited film adaptation of On the Road is presently premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, and I cannot wait until it hits theaters. Carlo, Sal, Dean, this has been a long time coming. From the snippets I’ve seen so far, I think the filmmakers just might have pulled it off.
  • And because just one drinking game isn’t nearly enough, I’ll probably follow up my Game of Thrones marathon with Anne of Green Gables, with drinking games for both movies.

Meandering Around the Interweb

In my various hours of wandering through book blogs far and wide, I’ve come across some pretty fantastic posts lately, so I thought I would spotlight my favorites. Hopefully I can make this a semi-regular feature, although my laziness will test the bounds of my determination to do so, so stay tuned for now.

  • The Final Battle in the YA Fantasy Showdown was a delightful bit of wordplay between Howl from Diana Wynne Jones’s Castle series and Gen from Megan Whalen Turner’s The Queen’s Thief series. I know that these two ladies were mutually inspired by the other’s writing, so it’s wonderful to see what a meeting between these two unreliable characters might have been like.
  • While I’ve yet to get my hands on a copy of Kristin Cashore’s Bitterblue, this series of letters among Bitterblue, Katsa, Po, Raffin and Giddon set post-Graceling whets my appetite and makes me want to reread the first two in the Seven Kingdoms series.
  • Justin Gustainis recently wrote a pithy post about the tenable distinction between urban fantasy, paranormal, horror, and all the supernatural genres that fall in between.
  • After reading Cath Crowley’s Graffiti Moon earlier this year, I immediately went in search of all of the fabulously described pieces of art that pepper Lucy and Ed’s narrations. Luckily, Adele at Persnickety Snark had already managed to track them all down.